Archive for September 2016

September is the time to plan for tax season

autumn-leavesAs the third quarter comes to an end, it’s time to start evaluating your business’ financial standing going into the final quarter of the year. Was this year better or worse than last year? How close are you to reaching your financial goals for this year?

If you’re a landscaper, your season will be coming to a close in September and if revenue is down, you might have to get creative to increase your financial standing. But, if you’re a retailer, your profit season is just beginning.

September is your last chance to make important decisions to finish out the year strong. To estimate your tax liability, you’ll need to provide your tax professional’s office with a year-to-date financial statement through June or July. We anticipate the second half of the year will be similar to the first half.

If you’ve had a good year, I would hate for you to buy a new computer in January. If you’re planning to make a large purchase in the first three months of the year, it may be better to buy it now. If you have a printer that’s going out or your growing business will need additional equipment, you may not want to wait to make those purchases.

Every year there comes a point in tax planning when you start thinking about how much you’ll have to pay in taxes. In order for you to have taxable income, you need to exercise discretion over your purchases in the next several months, such as paying for a family vacation, buying a car, or an anniversary gift for your spouse.

These are great purchases but you’ll have to keep in mind that the tax bill will come in April. If you need to save up for it, you still have several months to do so.

It’s also a good idea to assess your financial standing again at the end of November so you can prepare for any financial repercussions on your tax filing. If you don’t set a plan in place, you might end up paying more when your taxes are due. It might be this year or maybe the next, but eventually you’ll be paying more than necessary if you don’t plan appropriately.

September is just the time to set a tax plan or review your current plan so you can end the year with your financial targets in place. Call our office at 405-341-7044 to schedule a time to visit with us about your year-end financial goals.

As the third quarter comes to an end, it’s time to start evaluating your business’ financial standing going into the final quarter of the year. Was this year better or worse than last year? How close are you to reaching your financial goals for this year?

If you’re a landscaper, your season will be coming to a close in September and if revenue is down, you might have to get creative to increase your financial standing. But, if you’re a retailer, your profit season is just beginning.

September is your last chance to make important decisions to finish out the year strong. To estimate your tax liability, you’ll need to provide your tax professional’s office with a year-to-date financial statement through June or July. We anticipate the second half of the year will be similar to the first half.

If you’ve had a good year, I would hate for you to buy a new computer in January. If you’re planning to make a large purchase in the first three months of the year, it may be better to buy it now. If you have a printer that’s going out or your growing business will need additional equipment, you may not want to wait to make those purchases.

Every year there comes a point in tax planning when you start thinking about how much you’ll have to pay in taxes. In order for you to have taxable income, you need to exercise discretion over your purchases in the next several months, such as paying for a family vacation, buying a car, or an anniversary gift for your spouse.

These are great purchases but you’ll have to keep in mind that the tax bill will come in April. If you need to save up for it, you still have several months to do so.

It’s also a good idea to assess your financial standing again at the end of November so you can prepare for any financial repercussions on your tax filing. If you don’t set a plan in place, you might end up paying more when your taxes are due. It might be this year or maybe the next, but eventually you’ll be paying more than necessary if you don’t plan appropriately.

September is just the time to set a tax plan or review your current plan so you can end the year with your financial targets in place. Call our office at 405-341-7044 to schedule a time to visit with us about your year-end financial goals.

Why I still call my wife my bride

bridal-bouquetI recently took a friend of mine to the airport after a weekend stay with us. It was an early morning flight and after seeing him off, I stopped at a coffee stand in the airport to pick up a cup of coffee for my wife, Holly, who was waiting in the car.

I asked the woman behind the counter if she had almond milk or soy milk, which she did. I said, “Oh, my bride would love that! I’ll take a coffee with almond milk.” The barista started making my coffee and asked how long we’ve been married. I told her we’ve been married for 31 years. She stopped making the coffee and said, “Thirty-one years? Why did you call her ‘my bride’?”

“I call her my bride because it reminds me that I need to treat her as such. She’s not my old lady, she’s not my main squeeze, she’s not my baby mama—she’s my bride,” I said. “I want to treat her the way she’s deserved since the day she walked down the aisle and took my last name.”

I think words matter and the words we choose have power to shape both how we see things and how others see things. I intentionally call Holly my bride in all situations—when we’re in public or private, talking to strangers, or visiting with long-time friends. When I constantly call her my bride, it makes me think about her differently. She deserves my respect, my patience, my kindness and my joy. And so I treat her like she’s my bride.

Friday night is date night for us. And when we have date night, we ask each other questions to get to know each other more deeply. Every time we do this, at least twice in a night I’ll have “ah-ha” moments and learn something totally new about her. Even after 35 years of our relationship, I still learn something new all the time. To love our wives in a gospel-centered way is not let our love grow cold, but to keep at fanning the flame of joy we had the day we were first wed!

Is there some place in your marriage where a word change might communicate something more accurately? Is there some place where a word change might affect how your bride sees herself? If your current word choices makes her feel bad or unimportant, you may want to change up your language and see how that affects your relationship.